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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
a bill that would allow businesses to refuse services to gays and lesbian by invoking religion. jan brewer vetoed the bill. but cecilia vega reports it will not stop a nationwide debate. >> reporter: it was the arizona bill that ignited a national firestorm. >> nobody rides in the back of the bus and everybody sits at the lunch counter. we fought that battle once. that's what this battle is. >> reporter: with polls showing a public shift on gay rights. a majority of americans now support same-sex marriage. the pressure for arizona governor jan brewer to veto the bill was fierce. major american companies came out swinging, calling arizona's law bad for business. in the end, brewer vetoed the bill. >> religious liberty is a core american and arizona value. so is non-discrimination. >> reporter: this as some of the most conservative states have become the new battle ground in the same-sex marriage war. a federal judge striking down texas' ban. so-called religious freedom laws like the one so fiercely debated in arizona, now seen as yet another weapon in the fight by supporters of the b
shot dead. >> he lost his life for the sake of his country and the sake of his religion. the current rulers are to be blamed. >> reporter: in the last few weeks there have been strikes and protests by workers who want to be paid more. keeping a lid on these would be a challenge for the cabinet. once again there will be a new government in egypt. >> al jazeera continues to demand release of its staff held in egypt. they have now spent 63 days in prison. they are accused of having links to a terrorist organization and spreading false news. al jazeera rejects the charges. and another journalist from the al jazeera arabic has been held and has been on a hundre a hunge to protest his imprisonment. >>> joaquin guzman is considered a folk hero who gave them jobs. from northwestern mexico, how are people reacting to the news? >> reporter: well, we've seen some pretty strong reactions here over the past week since the arrest of el chapo. today, in fact, there is a demonstration being organized a march, i should say, being organized by a group said sin lowans for peace. thousands of people sho
? >> playing with the mix of islam religion and politics, it is a very sensitive affair. when you see a neighboring country, a an ally for this matr giving a media platform, economic support for a very devious group of personnel that have been using the mix of reasonable and politics to destabilize countries, and to actually become dictators. frankly, i'm astonished at the previous official in the segment where he says they don't support dictators. there is a dictatorship in the making. muslim brotherhood is an dictator organization. everybody knows that. but creating the proper platforms, that is a very devious and worrisome matter. >> would this had been as bad except here in qatar there i whe they are very critical of other countries of gcc. is he planning insurrection? >> qatar has given him legitimacy and credibility, and therefore a fan base. a very dangerous fan base. they legitimatize suicide-bombing, and created a lot of verdicts that was against regimes and other countries. if that is not interference in the name of reasonabl religion,t know what it is. he was a preacher bef
. >>> arizona governor jan brewer was forced to veto legislation that would use religion to codify hate and deny basic rights. major corporations like american airlines, at&t, the nfl and mlb, in addition to business leaders throughout the state urged the governor to veto the bill. while similar measures have been introduced in about a dozen other republican-controlled states like kansas, south dakota and tennessee, by the end of the week, the moral and economic arguments seem to have had an impact. now this comes as we've seen a rapidly growing acceptance of lbgt americans and issues like same-sex marriage. a federal judge ordered kentucky to immediately begin recognizing same-sex marriages from other states. so that suggests to me that the reason for the proliferation of these hateful measures is fear. just like the anti-women's rights and anti-voting rights legislation we've seen in states, these measures represent fear of a changed reality. but the question now is whether or not the events of last week represent a final tipping point in ensuring equal rights for lbgt americans. let's bring i
of legislation. tell me how this is tied to, and maybe differs from arizona's freedom of religion laws. >> that is an interesting question, how did arizona get to this moment? i wish we could speak to that, but where would we begin. the freedom of religion law passed in 1999 and existed at the federal lovel level in 1993. we inserted a line in this newest incarnation of the bill that talks specifically about a belief being sincerely held. that's where people are getting hung up and feeling like everybody feels that their beliefs are sincerely held. that is language added to this bill, and some say it clarifies. >> say the governor signs this piece of legislation into law, and businesses turn away gays and lesbians lead to go discrimination lawsuits. would it be up to a judge to determine the sincerity of a business ow owner's religious convictions? >> reporter: in arizona the state does not prohibit gay or lesbian. in three of our largest cities they are. in that case the city would have to bring case against the individual business owner. so a person, i, couldn't bring a lawsuit again
and demonstrators. >> translator: he lost his life for the sake of his country and for the sake of his religion. the current rulers inky just a e to be blamed. >> reporter: this have been strikes and pro frost protests s who went to be paid more. the cabinet doesn't have time to do much of anything. in the a knew months president elects are due again. there will be yet another another government in egypt. >>> al jazerra continues to demand the reese lees of its staff being held in egypt. they have now spent 64 days in prison, they are accused of having links with a terrorist organization and spreading false news, al jazerra rejects the charges. another journalist from the network's arabic channel has been held since august. he's been on hunger strike for more than a month now to protest against his imprison think. >>> president obama is set to host israel's mime pinster benjamin netanyahu, two issues expected to top the a general dark negotiation with his iran and peace talks with the palestinians, netanyahu has another job while he's in town, to reassure his support base in the u.s. to back h
that discriminate on race, religion or sexual orientation. >> other companies that have taken a similar action because of this policy? >> yes, there are organizations like major league soccer and martin that cut the fund for now. >> thank you. >> and update on the top stories and then it is real money at the top of the hour. there's more to financial news than the ups and downs of the dow. for instance, can fracking change what you pay for water each month? have you thought about how climate change can affect your grocery bill? can rare minerals in china affect your cell phone bill? or how a hospital in texas could drive up your healthcare premium? i'll make the connections from the news to your money real. >> this is al jazeera america, we have a look at the top stories, russia denies the rofrt reports of issuing an ultimatum to ukraine. the russian ambassador is saying it is there at the request of the former president of ukraine and it is making investors nerving outstanding. russia is a big energy producer and fear of reducing the supplies the driving the prices higher. president obama is
fall simply along religious lines. i think there are a range of factors, politics, religion, economics and ideas about gender and sectixuality that impact ho people are safe or not. >> a quick thought: is there any effort at, say, embargos or sanctions against countries like uganda that have initiated these very tough laws? >> this is an incredibly controversial issue. there is a lot of debate about this. the uganda and lgbt movement is in heavy debate. civil society activists called for foreign governments to review their policies on foreign aid to uganda. they didn't call for foreign governments to withdraw aid. and this is a very important distinction that i hope hear. >> said, some governments have already made decisions about how the anti-homosexuality bill and now law will affect their aid to uganda and the government of denmark was one of the first to change its policies saying its hundreds of millions of dollars a year will no longer be given to the ugandan government, but it will be distributed among civil society in uganda. >> jessica sturn, thanks. >> thank you. >>> after t
for the sake of his country and religion. the current rulers in egypt are to be blamed. >> over the last few weeks there has been strikes and protests by workers who want to be paid more. keeping a lid on these will be a challenge for the new cabinet. it has not got much time to do anything. in the next few months presidential and parliamentary elections are due to get underway. once again there'll be another deposit in egypt. >> al jazeera continues to demand the release of its staff held in egypt. mohamed fadel fahmy, mohammed badr, and peter greste have spent 64 days in prin. they are accused of having links to a terrorist organization and spreading follows news. al jazeera relates the charges. another journalist, abdullah al-shami from the network's arabic channel has been on hunger strike for a month, after his imprisonment in august. >> let's look at the weather - beginning in california, i think. >> we are familiar with the situation that we have in california. and here, over the last few days we have seen a change in weather. we have seen the pineapple express bring in moisture, and
interpretation of their own religion. and then to claim persecution. the vast majority of germans are christian and nobody is claiming that the schooling system is a way that deprives them of the way of practice it of christianity. so i think i understand technically why as a matter of asylum would be rejected. but, let's hope somebody will exercise discretion and let them in on other grounds. >> yeah. the decision really lies with the administration. >> exactly. >> that is it for the panel. we will watch this one. stay tuned for oscar-nominated films you may have missed. uture is a pretty difficult thing to do. but, manufacturing in the united states means advanced technology. we learned that technology allows us to be craft oriented. no one's losing their job. there's no beer robot that has suddenly chased them out. the technology is actually creating new jobs. siemens designed and built the right tools and resources to get the job done. millions have raised their hand for the proven relief of the purple pill. and that relief could be in your hand. for many, nexium helps relieve heartburn sym
borders that has politics married to religion. >> that's something the uae can't count enance as being a sort of rival to the pour in abu dhabi. the likewise who have a wahabi outlook don't view the misslum brotherhood and its marriage of politics and islam as a legitimate force within their current tree. there are pro-muslim brotherhood supporters in these countries. they represent a genuine political force. >> worries these gulf states. qatar has had kawadari living there for 50 years. they have formed close links with the muslim brotherhood leadership, not just in egypt but across the region. they viewed it for a chance of expanding their interests. the others have viewed it as a threat to their interests. >> thank you very much for that, michael stephens >> reporter: thank you. >> in london there. >>> coming up here on the program, we will be taking a look at the big issues and the big players at the world's largest democracy prepares for national elections. >>> the little boy with big dreams. how a free school in bangladesh is giving him and other children hope. >> start with one
foundation and eddie glaude, a professor of religion and african american studies at princeton university. welcome, gail christopher and eddie glauchlted i want to start which gail christopher, because the kellogg foundation has a lot of money invested in this project. why is it essential what is important about it? >> when we look at the disparities that our young men of color face in terms of opportunity and access to opportunity in this country, it does not bode well for the future of the nation. young people of color make up about 23% of the population between ages 10 and 17. yet they make up over 50% of those who are incarcerated in the juvenile and sometimes criminal justice system. they are disproportionately suspended and expelled from school. the data is clear that there are underlying factors that are limited opportunities for this population group. and these underlying factors need to be addressed. >> why are the solutions in the hands of the private secter? >> they really aren't. the solutions are also in the public sector. but they aren't really focused in a specific way arou
religion, but as thomas jefferson was so shocked to find out, there is one religion that has a small component of it that believes that a sure way to paradise is to kill innocent men, women and children because they don't those religiously like radicals do. it's the reason thomas jefferson got his own copy of the koran that the library of congress still has. he wanted to see for himself. he was so well-read. he couldn't believe there was a religion that had a book, a holy book for a basis that would allow anyone to interpret it in such a way as to kill innocent men, women and children. there have been, to be sure, purported christians over the ages that thought it was their duty to go about and brutalize people who were not christians, but anyone who studies the teachings of christ about how we're to individually act knows those would not have been christians doing the kind of iolence that they did. it's not supported by the bible . what is supported in the bible is if you do evil, be afraid because god does not give the government to sort in vain. individually we're not supposed vi
. afghans may be divided by ethnicity, language and religion but they don't seem to be experiencing gridlock. the current presidential campaign does not evidence polarization, but rather the opposite. as public debates are surfacing, more agreement than discord on all major issues facing that country. according to a recent asia foundation survey, 76% of afghans believe they are better off today than they were under the taliban. again, i think the american figures for americans would be much lower. and it is easy to see why the afghans feel this way. between 2000 two and 2012, afghanistan experienced a greater improvement in health, in education, and in overall standard of living than did any other country in the world as measured by the u.n. development program. in education, literacy has increased from 12% of the population to 30%. in 2:00, an estimated 900,000 boys were in school and virtually no girls. today there are over 10 million children in school, nearly 40% of whom are girls. the number of teachers increased from 20,000 in 2002 to 175,000 today. higher education has also boomed. ac
religion if they didn't want to -- in particular if they didn't want to serve a customer. but the laws were not so specific as to say, well, you don't have to serve a gay person. they were just stating that you could cite religion as a reason not to do so in a court proceeding. now, whether or not they're a backlash to same-sex marriage, it's obvious the changes were proposed for that reason because that's what the legislators said that they were concerned about. i don't think it's going to do anything to stem the tide of support for same-sex marriage or for gay rights generally. >> adam, thank you. >>> up next, the "brain trust," spike lee, this is msnbc. suddee a mouthbreather. well, put on a breathe right strip and instantly open your nose up to 38% more than cold medicines alone. so you can breathe and sleep. shut your mouth and sleep right. breathe right. so you can breathe and sleep. "stubborn love" by the lumineers did you i did. email? so what did you think of the house? did you see the school ratings? oh, you're right. hey babe, i got to go. bye daddy! have a good day at school, ok
and ice of russia. bill: mike religioners is said putin is running circles around the united states. what do you expect him to do? >> well, i think the president needs to significantly change the u.s. policy. he is based the policy on russia when they feel more secure causes the world to feel more secure, actually what we're seeing the reverse. when russia feels more secure they tend to be more adventurese. that is certainly what we see playing out in the ukraine today. >> so what does our president do? >> well there's a couple of things the president can do. he one, can strengthen our ties with nato. he is exposed to expansion of nato that left ukraine, georgia, montenegro on hold. he could move forward with strengthening those ties. he could move to allow export of u.s. natural gas currently russia has a grip on europe where they are beholden to russia where they use it in the geopolitical leverage tool box. we can by entering into the opportunity to do that export and make a difference economically and have our al like some additional freedom. bill: there is a statement made by gentlem
relationship with ukraine, good diplomatic and economic religions. >> john kerry, i assume he was, if he's in washington, he was at the white house for this so-called meeting. we saw general martin dempsey, chuck hagel, james clapper, where's kerry? >> he is, we don't know where he is right now, but clearly, he has a very close relationship with sergey la the russian foreign minister. you've seen some talk about the russians possibly calling their ambassador back to moscow, but that's not really where the business between the u.s. and russia is done. it's done between capitals, the white house, between the kremlin and secretary kerry and lavrov. secretary kerry has had some positive effects with his relationship with lavrov. they put together those peace talks in geneva. we have on the syrian crisis, we haven't seen a lot of progress, but they are determined to work together and this is i think you should look for kerry to get much more involved. >> we know the vice president, joe biden, has been deeply involved in this crisis as well. stand by. i want to go to moscow right now. fred is
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)